Archive | Ecology

sedge early spring

Signs of Early Spring

Signs of Early Spring Winter Aconite (Eranthus hymelis) is in full bloom.  It is native to Europe, but it came along to this garden via a Red Trillium I transplanted from my old garden.  A member of the buttercup family, its golden cups are the earliest perennial to bloom in our area, sometimes as early […]

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pin oak

Mystery Oak Trees

Mystery Oak Trees There are three mature oaks from the Red Oak group growing on the parkway of Gertrude Street a couple of blocks from my house.  Tall and full-grown, they retained some of their leaves throughout the winter.  I could tell they weren’t Red Oak (Quercus rubra) or Black Oak (Q. velutina) and assumed […]

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Our Only World

Our Only World

I went to Book Club last Friday night. So–”why should we care? “ you say. It is an Environmental Book Club and I encourage all of you to begin or join one. Invite like-minded friends to create one in your area–there is no end of books to read concerning the environment. Ours  takes place on […]

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west sidewalk

Why Plant Native Plants?

WHY PLANT NATIVE PLANTS?   Native Midwestern plants are sustainable.  They are well-suited to the climate and soil conditions of the area where they are found naturally–they are grown successfully with little effort.  They are adapted to extreme temperatures, blustery winds, and intense sunlight.   They are drought-resistant–once established, after 2-3 years, they need no […]

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lead plant HH

A New Way of Gardening

Traditionally, the way plants were organized in parks and gardens reflected a culture that liked to order and discipline nature.  Contemporary planting design is not only freer, but also seeks to reflect nature.  It also addresses our concerns about how we garden sustainably and in partnership with nature.  Piet Oudolf & Noel Kingsbury Planting: A […]

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