Tag Archives: Prairie Dropseed

Prairie Grasses in Late Fall

Prairie Grasses By December, the flowers of herbaceous plants have all faded and the leaves of woody plants have fallen.  But the landscape is not barren: some may think this is the most beautiful time of year.  Why is that?  Prairie grasses come into prominence, creating stunning pictures. Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) is one of […]

Farewell, Indian Summer

Farewell Indian Summer   SONGWRITERS WILLIAMS, HARRY/HICKMAN, A Does anyone remember that song? Here’s the rendition by Glenn Miller; there is also one by Frank Sinatra. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aa_faILW6MQ Obviously dating me. In this song, Indian Summer was a metaphor for a romance that had begun in June and had faded by Indian Summer. What really is […]

Why Plant Native Plants?

WHY PLANT NATIVE PLANTS?   Native Midwestern plants are sustainable.  They are well-suited to the climate and soil conditions of the area where they are found naturally–they are grown successfully with little effort.  They are adapted to extreme temperatures, blustery winds, and intense sunlight.   They are drought-resistant–once established, after 2-3 years, they need no […]

Why are All These People Standing in the Rain?

Why are all these  people standing in the rain?   What are they looking at? They are the intrepid members of Northern Kane County Wild Ones on a garden tour last Saturday.   It poured down rain, but 26  people showed up, and we carried on. The property we visited is in a subdivision of […]

Midsummer

And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer.  Shakespeare Henry IV  JUNE 21 Midsummer Midwinter, the Winter Solstice, which we observe as Christmas, is over-celebrated in the United States; while Midsummer, celebrated widely in Europe, particularly in the more northern latitudes, is not observed here at all, unless we count the 4th of July.  In pagan […]

Prairie Grasses in Winter

During winter the winds come in crisp and invigorating from across the prairies.  At this season of the year the landscape assumes a dreary look to many who do not understand.  But to others, when the gray arms of the cottonwood are illuminated by the January sun and silhouetted against the blue sky, when sleeping […]

Through the Year 2014 July–December

Through the year 2014 July–December 6/28/14  Classic prairie combination for late June-early July:  Pale Purple Coneflower (Echinacea pallida), Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa), Wild Quinine (Parthenium integrifolium), and Stiff Coreopsis (Coreopsis palmata).  They don’t seem to be as prolific as usual this year, perhaps because it was a rather cool summer, as Midwestern summers go, and […]

October Potpourri

Even though it was somewhat cloudy this morning, I was drawn outside by the kaleidoscope of colors I saw through the windows.  The most colorful of all was the American Hazelnut (Corylus americana) Its leaves have turned to vermillion, cranberry, apricot, and topaz that mix in with lingering chartreuse, while pendulous catkins form along the […]

This Week in my Garden

This week in my garden Asters are still the stars in the autumn garden–this is New England Aster-formerly known as Aster novae-angliae and is now Symphyotrichum novae-angliae.  The most colorful and best known of the species asters, its intense purple flowers bloom from early September until the end of October.  Growing 3-4’ tall, in the […]

A New Way of Gardening

Traditionally, the way plants were organized in parks and gardens reflected a culture that liked to order and discipline nature.  Contemporary planting design is not only freer, but also seeks to reflect nature.  It also addresses our concerns about how we garden sustainably and in partnership with nature.  Piet Oudolf & Noel Kingsbury Planting: A […]